Supporters

Garden Supporters: Elected Officials, Community Board and Parks and Community Groups

Since learning in 2013 about the side deal to build on the Garden, Manhattan Community Board 2 has held four public hearings at which overwhelming community sentiment has been for saving the Garden.

The Garden serves hundreds of visitors daily with as many volunteers, supporters have written 5,500 letters to stop development and our Friends group publishes newsletters regularly to 7,000 email subscribers.

Supporters include the following elected officials, Community Board 2, former NYC Parks Commissioner Adrian Benepe and 18 parks and community organizations:

Elected Officials

Parks Organizations

Community Organizations

Community Board 2 Resolutions

  • Feb. 18, 2016: A resolution responding to a presentation from NYC Department of Housing Preservation and Development and requesting a unified effort to achieve affordable housing development in Community Board 2 while preserving Elizabeth Street Garden.
    The meeting was attended by about 300 people who in a show of hands indicated strong support for preserving the Garden.
  • Dec. 17, 2015: A resolution to assure the best public use of three water tunnel shaft sites in the district, including supporting a substantial reduction of the amount of promised open space at one of the sites so that affordable housing and indoor recreation can be developed there, but only if community open space needs are addressed, and specifically, only if Elizabeth Street Garden is preserved as a public park.
  • Aug. 20, 2015: A resolution opposing a request from NYC Department of Housing Preservation and Development to Lower Manhattan Development Corporation funding for an affordable housing project at 21 Spring St., aka Elizabeth Street Garden.
  • Jan. 23, 2014: A resolution urging the City to transfer Elizabeth Street Garden to NYC Department of Parks and Recreation and committing CB 2 to work with the City and elected officials to support preservation and creation of affordable housing in the district.
    The public hearing was attended by 157 guests, mostly nearby neighbors, who demonstrated overwhelming and passionate support for the preservation of the Garden, while only four people spoke in favor of affordable housing at the site and one expressed concern about the safety of current sculpture installations.